Protected Conversations

Unless either party has behaved improperly, s.111A Employment Rights Act 1996 operates to protect pre-termination discussions between employer and employee from being referred to by either party in any subsequent unfair dismissal claim in the Employment Tribunal. However, the EAT…

Covert Surveillance in the Workplace

The European Court of Human Rights in Lopez Ribalda & Ors v Spain recently held that covert camera surveillance at work breaches the ECHR Article 8 right to privacy. In this case, a supermarket installed both visible and hidden surveillance…

Carillion enters into liquidation

Construction giant Carillion has entered into liquidation with debts estimated to be around £1.5 billion. Carillion employs around 20,000 in the UK. It has been reported that Carillion outsourced virtually all of its work, which included maintenance of prisons, hospitals…

Rest Breaks and Compensatory Rest

In the case of Crawford v Network Rail Infrastructure Limited, the EAT considered the requirements contained in Regulation 12 of the Working Time Regulations 1998 (“WTR”) to provide a rest break of not less than 20 minutes where a worker’s…

Whistleblowing – in the public interest or of self-interest?

In Parson v Airplus International Ltd, Ms Parson (a qualified non-practising barrister) made a number of disclosures to her employer. She argued the disclosures qualified for protection and therefore her dismissal shortly after was automatically unfair for whistleblowing. The tribunal…

260 employers named and shamed for underpaying 16,000 workers

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) have identified a record-breaking £1.7 million in back pay for 16,000 workers and have fined employers £1.3 million for the underpayment. Retail, hairdressing and hospitality businesses were the biggest offenders with…

The rights of ‘out-sourced’ workers

The Independent Workers’ Union of Great Britain (IWGB) are launching a legal challenge on behalf of receptionists, security officers and porters who work at the University of London but are actually employed through a facilities management company. It will argue…

Holiday Pay Claims

The CJEU in King v Sash Windows considered whether a worker who does not take paid annual holiday, because the employer refuses to pay, carries over his entitlement to paid holiday or whether it is lost at the end of…

Yet another ruling on ‘gig’ workers

The Central Arbitration Committee (CAC) has ruled that Deliveroo drivers are self-employed. The test case was brought by the Independent Workers Union of Great Britain (IWGB) on behalf of drivers who were not satisfied with their current terms and conditions…

Uber Drivers are ‘Workers’

The EAT in Uber BV v Aslam has ruled that Uber drivers be classed at workers, for the purposes of their claims under the Employment Rights Act 1996, Working Time Regulations 1998 and National Minimum Wage Act 1998, rather than…